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Detroit officials say ShotStoppers shows a big reduction in violent crime in four of six neighborhoods

Detroit officials say ShotStoppers shows a big reduction in violent crime in four of six neighborhoods

A majority of the community-based violence intervention groups Detroit has put to work in six of the city’s most violent neighborhoods have seen success in the past three months.

The city shared the latest crime data Tuesday from the six neighborhoods where the ShotStoppers program has worked. Four of the six groups working in these neighborhoods showed a decline in violent crime that was well above the city average of a 20% decline, with homicides and non-fatal shootings dropping from 33% to 67%.

ShotStoppers program manager Michael Peterson said the program works by developing relationships with people deep in those communities and keeping a finger on the pulse of potential conflicts.

“Now they have these individuals who may have contributed to the violence at some point,” Peterson said. “Now they’re really trying to do everything they can to change their lives, and change their communities.”

Peterson said the data shows that community-based violence intervention programs can work.

He said a bigger goal now is to secure longer-term, sustainable funding for the program, which is currently 100% funded by American Rescue Plan Act money.

“We don’t want to take anything away from the community that we invested so much in up front, especially when we see the progress, we see the benefits that are coming out of it now,” Peterson said. .

Bills now pending in the Michigan House would create a public safety trust fund that would help fund programs like ShotStoppers.