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4 Ways to Cool Your Body Quickly in Extreme Heat – NBC Chicago

4 Ways to Cool Your Body Quickly in Extreme Heat – NBC Chicago

It’s going to be a hot week in Chicago, and such high temperatures pose serious health risks. But if you find yourself overheating, do you know what to do to cool down quickly?

Heat stroke and heat exhaustion are among the most common threats during dangerously hot conditions, and if not treated quickly enough, they can lead to organ damage or possibly even death, according to medical experts.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that extreme heat kills about 1,220 people in the U.S. each year.

Experts say there are some simple and quick ways to ensure your body cools down.

According to American Family Care, which operates several urgent care centers in the US and Illinois, there are four things in particular you can do to cool down when you need to:

1. Cool your collar

“The area of ​​the brain that regulates body temperature is at the base of the neck, cool this spot and you can trick your body into feeling cooler,” the medical company said.

Some ways to do this are to soak a bandana in water and wrap it around your head or drape it over the back of your neck. You can also put an ice pack behind your head.

2. Cool ‘Hotspots’

So-called ‘hotspots’ on your body are places where cooling a small location can actually help cool your entire body.

The most noticeable of these are your wrists.

“Lowering the temperature in the blood of your arms can help cool your entire body,” according to American Family Care. “Blood from your arms circulates in the larger bloodstream of your body.”

The Red Cross adds that cooling the ankles could also be effective.

“You can quickly cool yourself by placing your hands and feet in cold water. Wrists and ankles have many pulse points where blood vessels are close to the skin, which helps you cool down faster,” the agency states.

It is recommended to hold your wrists under cold water for a maximum of 30 seconds.

3. Buy peppermint

Experts say menthol can “stimulate your nerves and trick your body into thinking you’re cooler when you’re overheated.”

Mint contains menthol, which means things like peppermint lotion or a spray bottle of water mixed with peppermint oil can help you.

Where should you place it? You can rub the lotion on your skin or spray parts of your body, especially areas like your neck or forehead, to cool down.

4. Eat water

No, this is not a typo and it didn’t mean to say “drink.”

Eating foods with a high water content can help prevent dehydration and ensure you get enough water throughout the day.

Eating certain fruits and vegetables that contain more than 90% water can also help replenish the electrolytes you may lose through your sweat.

So which foods can do this? According to American Family Care, some options include:

  • Celery
  • Cucumber
  • Tomatoes
  • Watermelon
  • Cauliflower
  • Strawberries
  • Peas

Now that you know some unexpected ways to cool your body, it’s also important to know the signs of when your body is overheating.

“The mistake people make is not being aware of their symptoms,” Dr. Trevor Lewis, chairman of Emergency Medicine at Cook County Health, told NBC Chicago last summer.

Heat stroke, heat exhaustion and heat cramps can all occur during periods of extreme heat, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, all three can show different symptoms.

For example, people with heat stroke often exhibit red, warm and dry skin, without sweating, the CDC says. Symptoms of heat exhaustion include heavy sweating, according to the CDC.

Symptoms of heat stroke

The most serious heat-related illness, heat stroke, can cause permanent disability or death if left untreated. According to the CDC, heat stroke occurs when the body can no longer control its temperature. If heat stroke does occur, a person’s body temperature can rise to 106 degrees or higher within 15 minutes.

Symptoms of heat stroke include:

  • Confusion, altered mental status, slurred speech
  • Loss of consciousness (coma)
  • Hot, dry skin or profuse sweating
  • To attack
  • Very high body temperature

If you think heat stroke is possible and you notice symptoms, call 911 immediately.

Symptoms of heat exhaustion

Less dangerous than heat stroke, heat exhaustion occurs when your body cannot cool itself through sweating, according to the Cleveland Clinic. It often presents with symptoms such as:

  • muscle cramps
  • headache
  • dizziness
  • weakness
  • fatigue
  • nausea
  • vomit

Certain factors make a person more susceptible to heat-related illnesses, such as dehydration, activity level and age. According to Dr. Thomas Waters, an emergency medicine physician at the Cleveland Clinic, infants, children and older adults are at the greatest risk for both heat exhaustion and heat exhaustion.

If you suspect heat exhaustion, it is critical that you get out of the elements as soon as possible.

You should take steps to lower your body temperature, such as rehydrating, immersing yourself in a tub of cold water, and applying ice packs to the neck, armpits, and groin. For the best chance o

Heat stroke, heat exhaustion and heat cramps can all occur during periods of extreme heat, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, all three can show different symptoms.

For example, people with heat stroke often exhibit red, warm and dry skin, without sweating, the CDC says. Symptoms of heat exhaustion include heavy sweating, according to the CDC.

Symptoms of heat stroke

The most serious heat-related illness, heat stroke, can cause permanent disability or death if left untreated. According to the CDC, heat stroke occurs when the body can no longer control its temperature. If heat stroke does occur, a person’s body temperature can rise to 106 degrees or higher within 15 minutes.

Symptoms of heat stroke include:

  • Confusion, altered mental status, slurred speech
  • Loss of consciousness (coma)
  • Hot, dry skin or profuse sweating
  • To attack
  • Very high body temperature

If you think heat stroke is possible and you notice symptoms, call 911 immediately.

Symptoms of heat exhaustion

Less dangerous than heat stroke, heat exhaustion occurs when your body cannot cool itself through sweating, according to the Cleveland Clinic. It often presents with symptoms such as:

  • muscle cramps
  • headache
  • dizziness
  • weakness
  • fatigue
  • nausea
  • vomit

Certain factors make a person more susceptible to heat-related illnesses, such as dehydration, activity level and age. According to Dr. Thomas Waters, an emergency medicine physician at the Cleveland Clinic, infants, children and older adults are at the greatest risk for both heat exhaustion and heat exhaustion.

If you suspect heat exhaustion, it is critical that you get out of the elements as soon as possible.

You should take steps to lower your body temperature, such as rehydrating, immersing yourself in a tub of cold water, and applying ice packs to the neck, armpits, and groin. For the best chance of preventing illness, drink plenty of water, take breaks if you are outside for long periods of time and immediately move to a cool place if you notice signs of heat exhaustion, the article says.

Chicago Weather Forecast

Monday is expected to be a balmy and warm day, with a long stretch of 90-degree temperatures and even higher heat indices, the NBC 5 storm team said.

MORE: Chicago’s public pools open for the season Monday — with one big change

“We will see temperatures in the 90s and high humidity every day this week,” NBC 5 meteorologist Alicia Roman said.

The forecast for Monday in the Chicago area calls for a high temperature of 96 degrees — which could tie the record for the Chicago area set in 1957, Roman said.

“There’s no cooling at the lake today,” Roman pointed out.

In addition, humidity levels will cross the line between “muddy” and “extreme” on Monday, Roman added, noting dew point temperatures in the 60s and 70s.

“Moisturize, moisturize, moisturize,” Roman warned.

MORE: As temperatures rise, here’s how to protect yourself from heat-related illnesses

Isolated afternoon storms may also occur Monday as the day warms, Roman said.

“There is a small chance of a storm due to the heat of the day,” Roman said. “Not everyone will see it.”

Locations where storms occur could see quick, heavy rain showers, Roman said.

Temperatures in the 90s and the chance of isolated storms will continue through the rest of the week, Roman said, with relief not expected until the weekend as a cold front passes.

More showers and storm chances are expected by then, Roman said, with temperatures dropping back into the mid-80s on Sunday.